Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • M. shared from The Faith of Leap, Embracing a Theology of Risk, Adventure & Courage (Shapevine) by Michael Frost, Alan Hirsch
    All disciples of Jesus (not just a select few) are called to an ongoing, risky, actional, extravagant way of life—a life resonant with that distinctly wild—and yes, Christlike—faithfulness of their Lord and Master.
    Note: the faith of leap!
  • M. shared from Multiplying Missional Leaders by Mike Breen
    We’ve created a corporate America-like church, and it’s because we buy into a false dichotomy between a leadership culture that produces leaders and a discipleship culture that produces disciples. Here’s what I mean: In American businesses, the goal is moving people from A to B, but has nothing to do with making people. We have one guy with the vision and a culture of volunteerism to help that one guy get his vision accomplished. He’s the genius with a thousand helpers. So while churches may claim to have leadership development programs, what they really have are volunteer pipelines.
    Note: "In American business, the goal is moving people from A to B, but has nothing to do with making people."
  • M. shared from Exponential: How to Accomplish the Jesus Mission (Exponential Series) by Dave Ferguson, Jon Ferguson
    Apprenticeship is not about finding people who can help us do tasks more effectively. We’re not talking about preparing people to simply replace us so we can move on to something else. At the heart of biblical apprenticeship is a mindset of reproduction: reproducing our leadership so the mission will be carried on to future generations.
  • M. shared from Viral: How Social Networking Is Poised to Ignite Revival by Leonard Sweet
    When you live out of your passion, you don’t drag yourself out of bed and head to work. In fact, you don’t work a day in your life. You serve, you play, you help, you love, you suffer. You were born to play in these ways, not to work at getting through life. In fact, when the Christian tradition uses the word passion to refer to Jesus’s suffering and death, it means two things: love and willingness to suffer.
    Note: Great quote from a great book!
  • M. shared from Boundaries with Teens: When to Say Yes, How to Say No by John Townsend
    Areas of the brain that are stimulated and challenged tend to grow and develop more. Those that are neglected will be less developed. So the more you expose your teen to healthy and helpful people and experiences, the more his brain will develop. It’s also true that the more you allow your teen to chill out and watch television, avoiding healthier activities, the less his brain will develop.
    Note: Good stuff!
  • M. shared from Boundaries with Teens: When to Say Yes, How to Say No by John Townsend
    Parents face many different issues and struggles in their efforts to parent their teens effectively, as demonstrated in this list of typical adolescent behaviors:            has a disrespectful attitude toward parents, family, and others          challenges requests or rules          is self-absorbed and unable to see things from anyone else’s perspective          is lazy and careless about responsibilities          has a negative attitude toward life, school, or people          is emotionally withdrawn and distant from you          has a tendency to pick...
  • M. shared from Absolutely Organize Your Family: Simple Solutions to Control Clutter, Schedules & Spaces by Debbie Lillard
    Sometimes that which drives you crazy about your kids is the one thing you see in yourself, if you take a close look. How often have you said, “I can't believe you waited until the last minute to do that paper!” and, “You've got to plan ahead” to your children? And yet, aren't you guilty of the same offenses? If you expect your children to be organized at home, in school, and with their time, then you've got to first look at yourself and see if you are setting a good example.
    Note: Unfortunate truth!
  • M. shared from Wide Awake: The Future Is Waiting Within You by Erwin Raphael McManus
    Some spend their lives painting images that only remember the past. Their dreams are a memorial to what was. Others live in regret and dream only of what could have been. Their art is a tribute to a world that we can only envy. Still there are those who dream of a world that does not yet exist; of a world that must exist. They dream a future that must be created.
    Note: "There are those who dream of a world that does not yet exist; of a world that must exist. They dream a future that must be created."
(Beaverton, OR United States)
M. L. Payne