Public Notes


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  • Maria shared from The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg
    key difference was the sense of control they had over their experience. “We’ve found this again and again,” Muraven told me. “When people are asked to do something that takes self-control, if they think they are doing it for personal reasons—if they feel like it’s a choice or something they enjoy because it helps someone else—it’s much less taxing. If they feel like they have no autonomy, if they’re just following orders, their willpower muscles get tired much faster. In both cases, people ignored the cookies. But when the students were treated like cogs, rather than people,...
    Note: could this answer struggles with productivity?
  • Maria shared from Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer
    Monotony collapses time; novelty unfolds it. You can exercise daily and eat healthily and live a long life, while experiencing a short one. If you spend your life sitting in a cubicle and passing papers, one day is bound to blend unmemorably into the next—and disappear. That’s why it’s important to change routines regularly, and take vacations to exotic locales, and have as many new experiences as possible that can serve to anchor our memories. Creating new memories stretches out psychological time, and lengthens our perception of our lives.
    Note: wisdom.
  • Maria shared from Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer
    What does chicken sexing have to do with my memory? Everything.