Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Matthew shared from The Pastor: A Memoir by Eugene H. Peterson
    Church is a core element in the strategy of the Holy Spirit for providing human witness and physical presence to the Jesus-inaugurated kingdom of God in this world. It is not that kingdom complete, but it is that kingdom. It had taken me a long time, with considerable help from wise Christians, both dead and alive, to come to this understanding of church: a colony of heaven in the country of death, a strategy of the Holy Spirit for giving witness to the already-inaugurated kingdom of God.
    Note: How's this for a concise ecclesiological statement?!
  • Matthew shared from Practicing Passion: Youth and the Quest for a Passionate Church by Kenda Creasy Dean
    Passion must feel like life and death — nothing less — or it is not passion.
    Note: @thochstetler @hlpatterson Anything less and we aren't doing our jobs.
  • Matthew shared from Practicing Passion: Youth and the Quest for a Passionate Church by Kenda Creasy Dean
    The point is that “the imitation of Christ” is a theological, not a sociological, literary, or historical, move. Our identification with Jesus depends not on what we do to “copy” Jesus, but on what God did to identify with us.
    Note: Really helpful.
  • Matthew shared from The Divine Commodity: Discovering a Faith Beyond Consumer Christianity by Skye Jethani
    If we are to awaken the Christian imagination to the corporate dimension of Jesus’ reconciling work, then we must recapture the symbolic power of the table. The table of Christ confronts and abolishes our consumer tendencies. It mocks our desire for comfortable community, and it abolishes the principle of homogeneity because we come to the table of Christ as guests and not the host. We have no control or authority over who is invited. Instead we are asked to surrender control and simply take our seat with the other wounded souls redeemed by the broken body and shed blood of Jesus. His table...
  • Matthew shared from The Divine Commodity: Discovering a Faith Beyond Consumer Christianity by Skye Jethani
    If we are to awaken the Christian imagination to the corporate dimension of Jesus’ reconciling work, then we must recapture the symbolic power of the table. The table of Christ confronts and abolishes our consumer tendencies. It mocks our desire for comfortable community, and it abolishes the principle of homogeneity because we come to the table of Christ as guests and not the host. We have no control or authority over who is invited. Instead we are asked to surrender control and simply take our seat with the other wounded souls redeemed by the broken body and shed blood of Jesus. His table...