Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Meg shared from NurtureShock: New Thinking About Children by Po Bronson, Ashley Merryman
    “I had a mother say, ‘You are destroying my child’s self-esteem,’ because I’d given her son a C. I told her, ‘Your child is capable of better work.’ I’m not there to make them feel better. I’m there to make them do better.”
    Note: amazing
  • Meg shared from NurtureShock: New Thinking About Children by Po Bronson, Ashley Merryman
    He recently published an article showing that for college students on the verge of failing in class, esteem-building praise causes their grades to sink further.
    Note: wow
  • Meg shared from NurtureShock: New Thinking About Children by Po Bronson, Ashley Merryman
    The presumption is that if a child believes he’s smart (having been told so, repeatedly), he won’t be intimidated by new academic challenges. The constant praise is meant to be an angel on the shoulder, ensuring that children do not sell their talents short. But a growing body of research—and a new study from the trenches of the New York City public school system—strongly suggests it might be the other way around. Giving kids the label of “smart” does not prevent them from underperforming. It might actually be causing it.
    Note: interesting
  • Meg shared from Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Book 2) by J.K. Rowling
    What Harry found most unusual about life at Ron’s, however, wasn’t the talking mirror or the clanking ghoul: It was the fact that everybody there seemed to like him.
  • Meg shared from Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (Book 1) by J.K. Rowling
    “The truth.” Dumbledore sighed. “It is a beautiful and terrible thing, and should therefore be treated with great caution.

Meg

(DAYTON, OH, United States)
Meg