Recent Activity

  • Melanie shared from The Happiness Advantage: The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology That Fuel Success and Performance at Work by Shawn Achor
    It turns out that our brains are literally hardwired to perform at their best not when they are negative or even neutral, but when they are positive.
    Note: Positive Psychology:
  • Melanie shared from My Life Is a Situation Comedy by Bill Persky
    Each series had one and the way the story went in each case clearly illustrates my point: On That Girl, Ann Marie called her father; Mary called a plumber; Kate and Allie tried to fix it themselves, flooded the apartment, then called a plumber and Kate had an affair with him for eight shows, breaking it off when he wanted to get married.
    Note: Bill Persky explains women on TV ....
  • Melanie shared from Imagine: How Creativity Works by Jonah Lehrer
    In one study, researchers compared the mental development of four-year-olds enrolled in a preschool that emphasized unstructured play with those in a more typical preschool in which kids were taught phonetics and counting skills. After a year in the classroom, the students in the play-based school scored better on a variety of crucial cognitive skills, including self-control, the allocation of attention, and working memory. (All of these skills have been consistently linked to academic and real-world achievement.) According to the researchers, the advantage of play is that it’s often deeply...
    Note: @jonahlehrer I love this. Would love to know study source. Goes to why #QualAuntieTime is essential
  • Melanie shared from Imagine: How Creativity Works by Jonah Lehrer
    The most creative ideas, it turns out, don’t occur when we’re alone. Rather, they emerge from our social circles, from collections of acquaintances who inspire novel thoughts. Sometimes the most important people in life are the people we barely know.
    Note: So true, now that I think about it. #entrepreneurship
  • Melanie shared from Imagine: How Creativity Works by Jonah Lehrer
    The lesson of letting go is that we constrain our own creativity. We are so worried about playing the wrong note or saying the wrong thing that we end up with nothing at all, the silence of the scared imagination.
    Note: Lesson of letting go: IMAGINE by @jonahlehrer
  • Melanie shared from Imagine: How Creativity Works by Jonah Lehrer
    To make this kind of performance possible, Ma cultivates an easy, casual air backstage. Thirty minutes before the concert begins, Ma disappears into a quiet room. When he reemerges, I expect him to be somber and serious and maybe a little nervous. Instead, Ma is just as disarming and funny as ever, teasing me about my tie, eating a banana, and making small talk with Adolphe. This ease is not a pose: Ma needs to stay relaxed. If he is too clenched with focus, too edgy with nerves, then the range of his musical expression will vanish. He will not be able to listen to those feelings that guide his...
    Note: From IMAGINE By Jonah Lehrer 'Letting Go'
  • Melanie shared from Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone by Eric Klinenberg
    Women who live alone in their thirties and forties face far more social pressure. Whether single by choice or by chance, most of the women we interviewed report that, after their twenties, concerns about whether and how to find a partner and have children became an inescapable part of their lives. They notice that certain people—friends, family, even recent acquaintances—are always calling attention to their domestic status. These are the ones who, in nearly every conversation, quickly ask whether they are dating anyone or start suggesting eligible bachelors, and treat everything else as secondary....
    Note: Reading Going Solo.... "always calling out domestic status... Everything else secondary."