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  • Michael shared from The Clean Coder: A Code of Conduct for Professional Programmers (Robert C. Martin Series) by Robert C. Martin
    Both business and programmers are tempted to fall into the trap of premature precision. Business people want to know exactly what they are going to get before they authorize a project. Developers want to know exactly what they are supposed to deliver before they estimate the project. Both sides want a precision that simply cannot be achieved, and are often willing to waste a fortune trying to attain it.
    Note: Minimizing lead time (as shown in previous example) allows both sides to let go and trust the cycle.
  • Michael shared from The Clean Coder: A Code of Conduct for Professional Programmers (Robert C. Martin Series) by Robert C. Martin
    Pairing can be very helpful as a way to deal with interruptions. Your pair partner can hold the context of the problem at hand, while you deal with a phone call, or a question from a coworker. When you return to your pair partner, he quickly helps you reconstruct the mental context you had before the interruption.
    Note: I put this as an answer to dealing w interuptions on stackexchange a few days before reading it here
  • Michael shared from The Clean Coder: A Code of Conduct for Professional Programmers (Robert C. Martin Series) by Robert C. Martin
    Would you visit a doctor who did not keep current with medical journals? Would you hire a tax lawyer who did not keep current with the tax laws and precedents? Why should employers hire developers who don’t keep current?
    Note: I used the same example in 97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know
(Carmel, IN USA)
Michael D. Brown