Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Michael shared from The Essential Guide for Hiring & Getting Hired: (Performance-based Hiring Series) by Lou Adler
    Few hiring managers are fully engaged in what is often called their most important task. Companies still post boring job descriptions hoping to find a person who has both an economic need to apply and is also a top performer. We still use indirect measures to assess candidates. Few recruiters are considered true partners and coaches by their hiring manager clients, just as they were pre-Internet. Most surprising of all is that most companies still spend most of their resources and efforts targeting the 17% of candidates who are actively looking, yet all want to hire the 83% who aren’t.
    Note: Good points
  • Michael shared from True to Our Feelings: What Our Emotions Are Really Telling Us by Robert C. Solomon
    If we were to think of an emotion as a simple bodily feeling, for instance, there would not be much to be done about it and there would be no obvious role for reflection. We can put up with the feeling like an itch or a headache, distract ourselves through activity, or diminish it with pharmaceuticals or booze. If an emotion is much more than a feeling and a bodily disturbance however, then there is the need to understand it and how it fits into our lives and, indeed, what we can and should do about it.
    Note: Well put doc
  • Michael shared from True to Our Feelings: What Our Emotions Are Really Telling Us by Robert C. Solomon
    Moments of true joy are for most people exceptional, and happiness is more like the continuing hum of a life well lived than a momentous feeling at any given time.
  • Michael shared from Attached: The New Science of Adult Attachment and How It Can Help You Find-and Keep-Love by Amir Levine, Rachel Heller
    Baruch Spinoza said: “All happiness or unhappiness solely depends upon the quality of the object to which we are attached by love.”
  • Michael shared from What To Do When You Are Rejected? by James Altucher
    The other day I read that 76% of the universe is comprised of “dark energy”. IN other words, we have zero clues as to what it is. Another 20% is “dark matter”, i.e. matter that we have zero clue about. Only 4% of the universe is actually made up of matter we understand. In other words, after Newton, Einstein, Heisenberg, and 2000 years of collective exploration of the universe and all its elements, we’ve basically failed.
    Note: True
  • Michael shared from Attached: The New Science of Adult Attachment and How It Can Help You Find-and Keep-Love by Amir Levine, Rachel Heller
    Numerous studies show that once we become attached to someone, the two of us form one physiological unit. Our partner regulates our blood pressure, our heart rate, our breathing, and the levels of hormones in our blood.
    Note: Oh snap
  • Michael shared from Attached: The New Science of Adult Attachment and How It Can Help You Find-and Keep-Love by Amir Levine, Rachel Heller
    Getting attached means that our brain becomes wired to seek the support of our partner by ensuring their psychological and physical proximity. If our partner fails to reassure us, we are programmed to continue our attempts to achieve closeness until they do.
    Note: hmm
  • Michael shared from 101 Dog Tricks: Step by Step Activities to Engage, Challenge, and Bond with Your Dog by Kyra Sundance, Chalcy
    Save the word “no” for when your dog is being naughty. If your dog is giving you an incorrect behavior, it is probably not intentional. Instead of “no,” try a more lighthearted “whoops!”
  • Michael shared from 101 Dog Tricks: Step by Step Activities to Engage, Challenge, and Bond with Your Dog by Kyra Sundance, Chalcy
    Save the word “no” for when your dog is being naughty. If your dog is giving you an incorrect behavior, it is probably not intentional. Instead of “no,” try a more lighthearted “whoops!”
  • Michael shared from Attached: The New Science of Adult Attachment and How It Can Help You Find-and Keep-Love by Amir Levine, Rachel Heller
    adults show patterns of attachment to their romantic partners similar to the patterns of attachment of children with their parents.
(Chicago, IL)
Michael Gorlin