About Michael S.

Since 1998, Michael Szul has designed and developed software applications for Fortune 500 companies, including AIG and Praxair. Later, he served as a senior software engineer for the technology division of Performance Media Group, contributing to their fast growth and success, including placement on the Inc. 5000.<br /><br />Szul's expertise in social software development led to a lateral move within the company to become the director of development for their travel social network. He even built successful social software for companies such as Apple Vacations and Conde Naste's Gourmet Magazine.<br /><br />As a partner at Barbella Digital, Inc., Szul currently designs and develops enterprise level workflow systems and mobile applications for educational institutions.<br /><br />After originally attending college for religion and philosophy, Szul graduated summa cum laude with a degree in psychology.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Michael shared from The Grapes of Math: How Life Reflects Numbers and Numbers Reflect Life by Alex Bellos
    In 1906, Pareto wrote that in Italy about 20 percent of the people owned 80 percent of the land. His zinger entered popular culture as the Pareto principle, or the 80/20 law: the rule that 20 percent of causes produce 80 percent of effects, a slogan about the unfairness of life. According to Richard Koch, who wrote a book about the Pareto principle, 20 percent of employees are responsible for 80 percent of output, 20 percent of customers bring in 80 percent of revenue, and we achieve 80 percent of our happiness during 20 percent of our time. The 80/20 law is the “key to controlling our lives,”...
    Note: The 80/20 rule.
  • Michael shared from The Grapes of Math: How Life Reflects Numbers and Numbers Reflect Life by Alex Bellos
    On the whole, the richest person in a country is quite a bit richer than the second richest, who is quite a bit richer (but less so) than the third richest, who is a bit richer (but less so) than the fourth richest, and so on.
    Note: Inequality as a mathematical law?
  • Michael shared from The Grapes of Math: How Life Reflects Numbers and Numbers Reflect Life by Alex Bellos
    Seven is unique among the first ten numbers because it is the only number that cannot be multiplied or divided within the group. When 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 are doubled the answer is less than or equal to ten. The numbers 6, 8 and 10 can be halved and 9 is divisible by three. Of the numbers we can count on our fingers, only 7 stands alone: it neither produces nor is produced.
    Note: The enigma of the number 7.
  • Michael shared from The Grapes of Math: How Life Reflects Numbers and Numbers Reflect Life by Alex Bellos
    In 2011, Dan King of the National University of Singapore and Chris Janiszewski of the University of Florida demonstrated than an imaginary brand of anti-dandruff shampoo was better liked when it was called Zinc 24 than when it was called Zinc 31. The respondents preferred Zinc 24 so much that they were willing to pay ten percent more for it. King and Janiszewski argued that customers prefer 24 because they are more familiar with the number from their schooldays, when the lines 3 × 8 = 24 and 4 × 6 = 24 are drummed into pupils by rote. By comparison, 31 is a prime number and does not appear...
    Note: We prefer products whose numbers are divisible and familiar.
  • Michael shared from The Grapes of Math: How Life Reflects Numbers and Numbers Reflect Life by Alex Bellos
    academic research corroborates Greg’s semiotic evaluation: for household products, divisible numbers are more attractive to consumers than indivisible ones.
    Note: More psychology of numbers.
(Virginia)
Michael S.