About Michael Stillwell

Aw, shucks.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Michael shared from Very Good, Jeeves: (Jeeves & Wooster) by P.G. Wodehouse
    Ask anyone at the Drones, and they will tell you that Bertram Wooster is a fellow whom it is dashed difficult to deceive. Old Lynx-Eye is about what it amounts to. I observe and deduce. I weigh the evidence and draw my conclusions. And that is why Uncle George had not been in my midst more than about two minutes before I, so to speak, saw all. To my trained eye the thing stuck out a mile.
    Note: Thoroughly enjoying my P.G. Wodehouse. Difficult to stop reading after a start like this.
  • Michael shared from Blood, Bones and Butter: The inadvertent education of a reluctant chef by Gabrielle Hamilton
    He beat the eggs and poured them into the prepared pan and then he agitated the eggs with a fork, constantly, over low heat until the curd was soft and tiny, and when the egg had adequately set, he tapped the pan, with gusto, on the burner to take out any last tiny gasp of air and then—did he flip it in the air, did he set it on fire, did he get out the chemical compounds to make omelette “eggs”? He did not. He grasped the pan in his left hand and tilted it slightly toward the back of the stove. With his right hand, he tapped his left wrist, like a junky searching for a good vein, over and...
    Note: Gabrielle Hamilton's description of Andre Soltner's omelet is also formative.
  • Michael shared from Blood, Bones and Butter: The inadvertent education of a reluctant chef by Gabrielle Hamilton
    Everyone thinks cooking is “fun.” Everyone who doesn’t do it professionally thinks it’s fun. And it is fun, but not for the same reasons they think it will be. They think it’s the same as trying out a new recipe for brownies like you do at home, with the radio on.
    Note: Waiting for rain to quit. Gabrielle Hamilton's "Blood, Bones & Butter" is pretty good.
  • Michael shared from The Road to Wigan Pier (Penguin Modern Classics) by George Orwell
    I have here a budget which was made out for me by an unemployed miner and his wife. I asked them to make a list which represented as exactly as possible their expenditure in a typical week. This man’s allowance was thirty-two shillings a week, and besides his wife he had two children, one aged two years and five months and the other ten months. Here is the list:   s. d. Rent 9 0½ Clothing Club 3 0 Coal 2 0 Gas 1 3 Milk 0 10½ Union fees 0 3 Insurance (on the children) 0 2 Meat 2 6 Flour (2 stone) 3 4 Yeast 0 4 Potatoes 1 0 Dripping 0 10 Margarine 0 10 Bacon 1 2 Sugar 1 9 Tea 1 0 Jam 0 7½...
    Note: Here's the full budget. (Formatting may get garbled.)
  • Michael shared from The Road to Wigan Pier (Penguin Modern Classics) by George Orwell
    The miner’s family spend only tenpence a week on green vegetables and tenpence halfpenny on milk (remember that one of them is a child less than three years old), and nothing on fruit; but they spend one and nine on sugar (about eight pounds of sugar, that is) and a shilling on tea.
    Note: Miners' privations in the 1930s: no fruit, few vegetables, and 1kg of sugar per person per week?!
(London, UK)
Michael Stillwell
Web Page: http://beebo.org/