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  • Miembro_de_Número shared from Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty
    there is ample reason to believe that the growth rate will not exceed 1–1.5 percent in the long run, no matter what economic policies are adopted.
  • Miembro_de_Número shared from Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty
    The nations of Europe have never been so rich. What is true and shameful, on the other hand, is that this vast national wealth is very unequally distributed. Private
  • Miembro_de_Número shared from Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty
    The evidence suggests that a rate on the order of 80 percent on incomes over $500,000 or $1 million a year not only would not reduce the growth of the US economy but would in fact distribute the fruits of growth more widely while imposing reasonable limits on economically useless (or even harmful) behavior. Obviously
  • Miembro_de_Número shared from Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty
    Taxation is neither good nor bad in itself. Everything depends on how taxes are collected and what they are used for. There
  • Miembro_de_Número shared from Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty
    an increase in the tax on capital income from 0 to 30 percent (reducing the net return on capital from 5 to 3.5 percent) may well leave the total stock of capital unchanged over the long run for the simple reason that the decrease in the upper centile’s share of wealth is compensated by the rise of the middle class. This is precisely what happened in the twentieth century—although the lesson is sometimes forgotten today.
    Note: Sunday reading.
(Bogotá D.C.)
Miembro_de_Número