Public Notes


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  • N. shared from The Lives of David Brainerd: The Making of an American Evangelical Icon (Religion in America) by John A Grigg
    the use of "white" as a racial category only emerged in northeastern America in the 1730s and was most often used, at least in diplomatic situations, to make distinctions between colonists and Indians.128 Writing in the relatively early days of such distinctions, Brainerd was using white, English, Indian, and "my people" to make another kind of distinction. Whenever the term white entered his usage, it almost always described colonists who were not Christian, or at least not living demonstrably Christian lives.
    Note: Interesting...
  • N. shared from Pascal's Pensées by Blaise Pascal
    there was once in man a true happiness of which there now remain to him only the mark and empty trace, which he in vain tries to fill from all his surroundings, seeking from things absent the help he does not obtain in things present? But these are all inadequate, because the infinite abyss can only be filled by an infinite and immutable object, that is to say, only by God Himself.
  • N. shared from Pascal's Pensées by Blaise Pascal
    Do you wish people to believe good of you? Don't speak.
  • N. shared from Black & Tan: A Collection of Essays and Excursions on Slavery, Culture War, and Scripture in America by Douglas Wilson
    One wit once distinguished the racism of the North and the racism of the South in this way: in the North, people did not care how far blacks advanced, just so long as they did not get close; in the South, people did not care how close blacks got, just so long as they did not advance. Reconstruction
  • N. shared from Black & Tan: A Collection of Essays and Excursions on Slavery, Culture War, and Scripture in America by Douglas Wilson
    Objectivity is a false god, and the worship of this idol is particularly pernicious in disciplines like journalism and history. It is not possible to be objective-although of course it is possible to be honest. By pretending to attain to objectivity, a writer's fundamental faith commitments are not eliminated, but rather submerged-and they then come out in interesting and intellectually dishonest ways.The
(New Jersey, USA)
N. Lang