About Norma Vasquez

Apparently, I eat books.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Norma shared from Beebo Brinker (Lesbian Pulp Fiction) by Ann Bannon
    “I make my own trouble, Beebo. I thrive on it. The way I see it—” she paused to give Beebo her arm, and Beebo took it smoothly, with a sense of power and burgeoning desire, “—life is flat and dreary without trouble.” Mona
  • Norma shared from Beebo Brinker (Lesbian Pulp Fiction) by Ann Bannon
    “It’s no disgrace to be scared, Beebo. Only to act like it.”
  • Norma shared from Beebo Brinker (Lesbian Pulp Fiction) by Ann Bannon
    there was no one to tell her that the time would come when the label wouldn’t frighten her; when she would be happy simply to be what she was.
  • Norma shared from Beebo Brinker (Lesbian Pulp Fiction) by Ann Bannon
    she, stung, would call him half a man, who played with other girls because he didn’t have what it took to keep one good woman satisfied. Or
  • Norma shared from Beebo Brinker (Lesbian Pulp Fiction) by Ann Bannon
    cops rousting respectable beards-and-sandals off their favorite park benches; hustling old dykes, who were Village fixtures for eons, off the streets so they wouldn’t offend the deodorized young middle-class wives.
  • Norma shared from Beebo Brinker (Lesbian Pulp Fiction) by Ann Bannon
    Do you think New Yorkers are wiser and better than the people in Juniper Hill, honey? Hell, no. They’re probably worse. The only difference is that here, you have a chance to be anonymous. Back home everybody knew who you were.”
  • Norma shared from The Burgess Boys: A Novel by Elizabeth Strout
    Books help. They help by allowing us to imagine the realities of another person’s inner—and outer—life. Bernard Malamud said that we value man by describing him. So
  • Norma shared from The Burgess Boys: A Novel by Elizabeth Strout
    And it was too late. No one wants to believe something is too late, but it is always becoming too late, and then it is.
    Note: regrets
  • Norma shared from The Burgess Boys: A Novel by Elizabeth Strout
    Standing in the open doorway, with her hand on the doorknob, she felt in the air the faint moistness of the faraway but approaching spring, and for a moment she was caught inside the sudden absurdity that keeping the door open would keep them free. To click it shut would seal them up eternally. Closing
  • Norma shared from The Burgess Boys: A Novel by Elizabeth Strout
    “It is not right,” he whispered, “for anyone, with laws or without, to continue making fear.”
    Note: it is not right...
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Norma Vasquez