About PATRICK LAFORGE

I am a collection of bits on the Internet.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • PATRICK shared from Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal by Nick Bilton
    “Should I close the door or leave it open?” Ev asked. “Yes,” Mark replied. Ev looked at Biz, who shrugged. “Yes I should close it, or yes I should leave it open?” Ev asked. “Yes,” Mark said again. Ev decided to play it safe, leaving the door half-open and half-closed.
    Note: When Zuckerberg met @Ev and @Biz. Wow.
  • PATRICK shared from Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal by Nick Bilton
    “Should I close the door or leave it open?” Ev asked. “Yes,” Mark replied. Ev looked at Biz, who shrugged. “Yes I should close it, or yes I should leave it open?” Ev asked. “Yes,” Mark said again. Ev decided to play it safe, leaving the door half-open and half-closed.
    Note: When Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook met the Twitter founders.
  • PATRICK shared from Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal by Nick Bilton
    “If there’s a fire on the corner of the street and you Twitter about it, you’re not talking about your status during that fire,” Ev said during one of their unending discussions about the topic. “You’re Twittering: There’s a fire on the corner of Third Street and Market.” “No. You’re talking about your status as you look at the fire,” Jack replied. “You’re updating your status to say: I’m watching a fire on the corner of Third Street and Market.”
    Note: Early days of Twitter. They were both right -- and both wrong.
  • PATRICK shared from Endtimes? (Excelsior Editions) by Daniel R. Schwarz
    Nytimes.com is conceived for a generation used to the web, raised on search engines, videos, and computer games. Younger people—by whom I, age seventy, mean anyone under age forty-five or fifty—regard the computer as a source of both information and recreation. For these readers, browsing the web is a physical activity requiring some dexterity and hand–eye coordination. Making choices, discarding them, probing elsewhere, and following leads are part of the pleasure and challenge of the web. Searches can be like mini-detective stories where one follows clues until answers are found, and the...
    Note: @felixsalmon FYI
  • PATRICK shared from Endtimes? (Excelsior Editions) by Daniel R. Schwarz
    What the website means is that the reader always has access to information because information remains on the Internet. Prior to the Internet, newspapers allowed much more choice than radio or TV and could be used—for a few days at least—more easily for searches or revisiting. We discard newspapers, perhaps after clipping a few articles that we often soon misplace. With the Internet, we needn't wait for a news broadcast, and we always have access to past information, thanks to Google and the Times archives. Of course, it always took longer to pick and choose with the physically imposing paper...
    Note: @shoq trying this.