Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Paul shared from Missional Apologetics: Cultural Diagnosis and Gospel Plausibility in C. S. Lewis and Lesslie Newbigin by David Feddes
    Lewis did not think the government’s divorce laws should compel a predominantly non-Christian population to abide by a Christian view of marriage; rather, “the Churches should frankly recognize that the majority of the British people are not Christians and, therefore, cannot be expected to live Christian lives.”
    Note: cs lewis on public and christian divide over marriage in the mid 20th century
  • Paul shared from Scripture and the Authority of God: How to Read the Bible Today by N. T. Wright
    Indeed, challenges are routinely dismissed as an attempt to go back to modernity or even premodernity, leaving us with a fine irony: an ideology which declares that all ideologies are power plays, yet which sustains its own position by ruling out all challenges a priori.
    Note: result of unceasing deconstruction
  • Paul shared from Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics by Ross Douthat
    For these reasons and more, the crisis of traditional Christianity, not the rise of the conservative churches, remains the major religious story of the 1960s and ’70s. The gains of certain denominations notwithstanding, the era witnessed an extraordinary weakening of organized Christianity in the United States and a fundamental shift in America’s spiritual ecology—away from institutional religion and toward a more do-it-yourself and consumer-oriented spirituality—that endures to the present day.
    Note: the thesis of the book
  • Paul shared from Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics by Ross Douthat
    Only religious premises could support basic liberal concepts like equality and human rights. Only God could ask human beings, as the poet put it, to “love their crooked neighbor with all their crooked heart.”
    Note: why w h auden became a Christian
  • Paul shared from Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics by Ross Douthat
    In America, because orthodoxy couldn’t be taken for granted, orthodoxy came alive.
    Note: in america, because orthodoxy couldn't be taken for granted orthodoxy became alive
(Sacramento, CA USA)
Paul H. Vanderklay