Public Notes


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  • Paul shared from Burning the Days: Recollection (Vintage International) by James Salter
    I will die, like every living thing, many of them more noble and important, trees, lakes, great fish that have lived for a hundred years. We live in the consciousness of a single self, but in nature there seems to be something else, the consciousness of many, of all, the herds and schools, the colonies and hives with myriads lacking in what we call ego but otherwise perfect, responsive only to instinct. Our own lives lack this harmony. We are each of us an eventual tragedy. Perhaps this is why I am in the country, to be close to the final companions.
  • Paul shared from Burning the Days: Recollection (Vintage International) by James Salter
    A writer cannot really grasp what he has written. It is not like a building or a sculpture; it cannot be seen whole. It is only a kind of smoke seized and printed on a page.
  • Paul shared from Burning the Days: Recollection (Vintage International) by James Salter
    already in darkness that was rising slowly, like a tide, the heavens being the last to go. A strange high sound begins in the earphones: gun-laying radar. Along the river a final time. Near its mouth the darkened earth begins to light up, first in one place and then another, like a city come to life. Soon the entire ground is flashing. They are firing at us far below. Black shellbursts, silent, appear around us, some showing an unexpected red core. It was victory we longed for and imagined. You could not steal or be given it. No man on earth was rich enough to buy it and it was worth nothing....
  • Paul shared from Wilderness: A Novel by Lance Weller
    When he turned back, Ned’s eyes were open, clear, and focused. He took a breath. “Pretty bad?” “Jesus, Ned.” Abel’s voice finally broke. He looked at Ned, then looked to find the stars above. He could not see them. “Someday,” he told Ned. “Someday, I’m goin’ to be somewhere where I can find the stars at night whenever I want them.”
    Note: When he turned back, Ned’s eyes were open, clear, and focused. He took a breath. “Pretty bad?” “Jesus, Ned.” Abel’s voice finally broke. He looked at Ned, then looked to find the stars above. He could not see them. “Someday,” he told Ned. “Someday, I’m goin’ to be somewhere where I can find the stars at night whenever I want them.”
  • Paul shared from Wilderness: A Novel by Lance Weller
    When he turned back, Ned’s eyes were open, clear, and focused. He took a breath. “Pretty bad?” “Jesus, Ned.” Abel’s voice finally broke. He looked at Ned, then looked to find the stars above. He could not see them. “Someday,” he told Ned. “Someday, I’m goin’ to be somewhere where I can find the stars at night whenever I want them.”
  • Paul shared from The French Lieutenant's Woman by John Fowles
    They lay as if paralyzed by what they had done. Congealed in sin, frozen with delight.
  • Paul shared from The French Lieutenant's Woman by John Fowles
    In what does the alienation of labor consist? First, that the work is external to the worker, that it is not a part of his nature, that consequently he does not fulfill himself in his work but denies himself, has a feeling of misery, not of well-being… The worker therefore feels himself at home only during his leisure, whereas at work he feels homeless. MARX, Economic and Political Manuscripts (1844)
    Note: In what does the alienation of labor consist? First, that the work is external to the worker, that it is not a part of his nature, that consequently he does not fulfill himself in his work but denies himself, has a feeling of misery, not of well-being… The worker therefore feels himself at home only during his leisure, whereas at work he feels homeless. MARX, Economic and Political Manuscripts
  • Paul shared from The French Lieutenant's Woman by John Fowles
    In what does the alienation of labor consist? First, that the work is external to the worker, that it is not a part of his nature, that consequently he does not fulfill himself in his work but denies himself, has a feeling of misery, not of well-being… The worker therefore feels himself at home only during his leisure, whereas at work he feels homeless. MARX, Economic and Political Manuscripts (1844)
(Wellesley, ON, Canada)
Paul