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  • Pen shared from The New Oxford American Dictionary by Erin McKean
    card sharp (also card sharper or card shark) n. a person who cheats at cards in order to win money.
    Note: I just learned a new term....
  • Pen shared from The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload by Daniel J. Levitin
    most fundamental principle of the organized mind, the one most critical to keeping us from forgetting or losing things, is to shift the burden of organizing from our brains to the external world. If we can remove some or all of the process from our brains and put it out into the physical world, we are less likely to make mistakes. This is not because of the limited capacity of our brains—rather, it’s because of the nature of memory storage and retrieval in our brains: Memory processes can easily become distracted or confounded by other, similar items. Active sorting is just one of many ways...
    Note: Why you should write stuff down or otherwise store information in retrieval systems.
  • Pen shared from The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload by Daniel J. Levitin
    A Gibsonian affordance describes an object whose design features tell you something about how to use it. An example made famous by another cognitive psychologist, Don Norman, is a door. When you approach a door, how do you know whether it is going to open in or out, whether to push it or pull it? With doors you use frequently, you could try to remember, but most of us don’t. When subjects in an experiment were asked, “Does your bedroom door open in to the bedroom or out into the hall?” most couldn’t remember. But certain features of doors encode this information for us. They show us how...
  • Pen shared from The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload by Daniel J. Levitin
    Because so many preliterate languages combine worms and bugs into a single category, ethnobiologists have made up a name for that category: wugs.
  • Pen shared from The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload by Daniel J. Levitin
    Junk drawers reveal a great deal about category formation, and they serve an important and useful purpose by functioning as an escape valve when we encounter objects that just don’t fit neatly anywhere else.
  • Pen shared from The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload by Daniel J. Levitin
    satisficing, a term coined by the Nobel Prize winner Herbert Simon, one of the founders of the fields of organization theory and information processing. Simon wanted a word to describe not getting the very best option but one that was good enough.
    Note: Word of the day:
  • Pen shared from Home Comforts: The Art and Science of Keeping House by Cheryl Mendelson
    “UHT” means “ultra-high temperature” pasteurization. UHT milk, if unopened, stays fresh for many months on the pantry shelf, but refrigerate it after opening. Check freshness dates on packages.
    Note: #food #safety
  • Pen shared from Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity by David Allen
    Time is that quality of nature that keeps events from happening all at once. Lately it doesn’t seem to be working. —Anonymous
  • Pen shared from The Esperanza Fire: Arson, Murder, and the Agony of Engine 57 by John N. Maclean
    Fatal fires are easy to second-guess in hindsight from a comfortable position far from howling winds and blistering heat. And in fairness, the same can be said about second-guessing official reports.
  • Pen shared from The Esperanza Fire: Arson, Murder, and the Agony of Engine 57 by John N. Maclean
    Irreverent firefighters call such places the stupid zone.
    Note: Great description of the WUI... #wildfire
(Santa Fe, NM USA)
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