Recent Activity

  • Rachael shared from Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the New Girlie-Girl Culture by Peggy Orenstein
    In a 2002 study, researchers gave two stereotypically masculine toys (a police car and a ball), two stereotypically feminine toys (a doll and a cooking pot), and two neutral toys (a picture book and a stuffed animal) to forty-four male and forty-four female vervet monkeys. The vervets had never seen the items before and were (obviously) unaware of their connotations. The results? Though males and females were similarly drawn to the neutral items, the males gravitated toward the boy toys, while the females went for the doll and—grrr!—the cooking pot.
    Note: This study sounds completely busted.
  • Rachael shared from JavaScript: The Good Parts: The Good Parts by Douglas Crockford
    undefined and NaN are not constants. They are global variables, and you can change their values. That should not be possible, and yet it is.
    Note: undefined and NaN are assignable in Javascript. This pleases me.
  • Rachael shared from Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era (Oxford History of the United States Book 6) by James M. McPherson
    An editor and a reporter for the New York World, McClellan’s most powerful newspaper, coined a new word with their anonymous pamphlet Miscegenation: The Theory of the Blending of the Races. Pretending to be Republicans, the authors recommended “miscegenation” as a solution of the race problem. This fusion, the pamphlet declared, would particularly “be of infinite service to the Irish.” If the Republicans were re-elected they would prosecute the war to “its final fruit, to the blending of the white and the black.” Although the Democratic press tried to pump up this hoax into a serious...
    Note: Whenever you get outraged about FOX News, etc., remember the same crap happened in the past.
  • Rachael shared from The New Soft War on Women: How the Myth of Female Ascendance Is Hurting Women, Men-and Our Economy by Caryl Rivers, Rosalind C. Barnett
    In 2012 the Bureau of Labor Statistics revealed that, in fact, we’re in the middle of a “mancovery”—men are getting back on their feet while women are slipping backward.1 Between June 2009 and June 2011, women lost close to 300,000 jobs, while men gained more than 800,000.
    Note: That "mancession" narrative was apparently false. Shocking I know.
  • Rachael shared from The New Soft War on Women: How the Myth of Female Ascendance Is Hurting Women, Men-and Our Economy by Caryl Rivers, Rosalind C. Barnett
    Moreover, women running for national office still get asked inappropriate questions like the absurd Fifty Shades of Grey query a journalist put to Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and Republican candidate Wendy Long in their sole debate in the campaign for a New York Senate seat. During a “lightning round” of questions about issues such as prostitution, guns and politics, the two candidates were asked whether they had read Fifty Shades of Grey. The Atlantic’s David A. Graham wrote: “Yes, that’s right, when you get two powerful women together for their one and only political debate, they’re...
    Note: Most ridiculous debate question ever.
  • Rachael shared from The New Soft War on Women: How the Myth of Female Ascendance Is Hurting Women, Men-and Our Economy by Caryl Rivers, Rosalind C. Barnett
    Dan Rather criticized CBS’s decision to bring her onto the show as an attempt to “dumb it down, tart it up in hopes of attracting a younger audience.”
    Note: Keep it classy Dan Rather.
  • Rachael shared from The New Soft War on Women: How the Myth of Female Ascendance Is Hurting Women, Men-and Our Economy by Caryl Rivers, Rosalind C. Barnett
    When the media highlight token high-achieving women like Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer, the rest of us tend to think broad progress has been made, even when it hasn’t. This may explain the current low level of feminist activism.
    Note: Just started "The New Soft War on Women". Thanks SPL and #SciWriteSum14 keynote tweets!
  • Rachael shared from Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era (Oxford History of the United States Book 6) by James M. McPherson
    This conviction underlay Lincoln’s remarks to a group of black leaders in the District of Columbia whom he invited to the White House on August 14, 1862. Slavery was “the greatest wrong inflicted on any people,” Lincoln told the delegation in words reported by a newspaper correspondent who was present. But even if slavery were abolished, racial differences and prejudices would remain. “Your race suffer very greatly, many of them, by living among us, while ours suffer from your presence.” Blacks had little chance to achieve equality in the United States. “There is an unwillingness on...
    Note: "Saint" Lincoln claimed by the modern Republican Party supported (for a time) black emigration.
  • Rachael shared from Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era (Oxford History of the United States Book 6) by James M. McPherson
    Anti-black sentiments were not a Democratic monopoly. The antebellum Negro exclusion laws of several midwestern states had commanded the support of a good many Whigs. In 1862 about two-fifths of the Republican voters joined Democrats to reaffirm Illinois’s exclusion law in a referendum. Senator Lyman Trumbull of Illinois, architect of the confiscation act, conceded that “there is a very great aversion in the West—I know it to be so in my State—against having free negroes come among us. Our people want nothing to do with the negro.”35 To placate this aversion, some Republicans maintained...
    Note: I'm Reading Battle Cry of Freedom. How many high schools actually cover this in detail?
  • Rachael shared from Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era (Oxford History of the United States Book 6) by James M. McPherson
    The Quartermaster Bureau furnished clothing manufacturers with a series of graduated standard measurements for uniforms. This introduced a concept of “sizes” that was applied to men’s civilian clothing after the war.
    Note: McPherson claims the Cil War gave us clothing sizes!