Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Rafael shared from Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
    He rejects the here, is unhappy with it, wants to be farther up the trail but when he gets there will be just as unhappy because then it will be “here.” What he’s looking for, what he wants, is all around him, but he doesn’t want that because it is all around him. Every step’s an effort, both physically and spiritually, because he imagines his goal to be external and distant.
  • Rafael shared from Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
    In the temple of science are many mansions…and various indeed are they that dwell therein and the motives that have led them there. Many take to science out of a joyful sense of superior intellectual power; science is their own special sport to which they look for vivid experience and the satisfaction of ambition; many others are to be found in the temple who have offered the products of their brains on this altar for purely utilitarian purposes. Were an angel of the Lord to come and drive all the people belonging to these two categories out of the temple, it would be noticeably emptier but...
  • Rafael shared from Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
    “What’s new?” is an interesting and broadening eternal question, but one which, if pursued exclusively, results only in an endless parade of trivia and fashion, the silt of tomorrow. I would like, instead, to be concerned with the question “What is best?,” a question which cuts deeply rather than broadly, a question whose answers tend to move the silt downstream.
  • Rafael shared from Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
    In the temple of science are many mansions…and various indeed are they that dwell therein and the motives that have led them there.
  • Rafael shared from Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
    Tate said that the first person is the most difficult form because the writer is locked inside the head of the narrator and can’t get out. He can’t say “meanwhile, back at the ranch” as a transition to another subject because he is imprisoned forever inside the narrator. But so is the reader! And that is the strength of the first-person narrative.
(Madrid, Spain)
Rafael P. Campoamor