Recent Activity

  • Ricardo shared from GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History by Diane Coyle
    Meanwhile, it is above all important not to confuse GDP with social welfare. The way the economy has changed has made the gap between GDP and welfare bigger than it used to be. The acceleration in the variety of products, in customization, and in the blurring of the boundary between leisure and work in many creative professions or vocations—all of these mean that GDP growth increasingly underestimates increases in welfare. Contrary to the popular impression that it exaggerates the improvement in our standard of living, the opposite may be true.
    Note: En una sociedad creativa, el PIB subestima la calidad de vida
  • Ricardo shared from GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History by Diane Coyle
    Official statisticians need to start thinking about how to measure better the production and consumption of “information” or digital products that clearly deliver value to consumers. Because GDP measures only monetary transactions, the new “free” business models are not being well measured, and neither are the new types of activity costing no money but of great value to consumers.
    Note: Dicen que el PIB de 2012 de EEUU habría subido 0.6 puntos más si se cuenta
  • Ricardo shared from GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History by Diane Coyle
    Grotesquely, there are cheerleaders for the king of Bhutan because of his claim that he seeks to increase gross national happiness, when Bhutan is one of the poorest and one of the more authoritarian countries in the world.
    Note: Sí, grotesco, y en España había bastantes de esos cheerleaders
  • Ricardo shared from GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History by Diane Coyle
    Even now, most members of the financial and business elite do not seem to have appreciated the extent to which they entered a separate moral universe; many seem to feel aggrieved, perceiving themselves to be unfairly scapegoated when it comes to assigning blame for the financial and economic crisis. This, too, is part of the arrogance, this belief that there were a few bad apples but nothing systemic had gone wrong in the way the financial industry and big businesses were being run. So, in a classic tragedy, arrogance leads to folly.
    Note: La elite en un universo moral separado
  • Ricardo shared from GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History by Diane Coyle
    also ask whether GDP alone is still a good enough measure of economic performance—and conclude not. It is a measure designed for the twentieth-century economy of physical mass production, not for the modern economy of rapid innovation and intangible, increasingly digital, services. How well the economy is doing is always going to be an important part of everyday politics, and we’re going to need a better measure of “the economy” than today’s GDP.
    Note: El PIB sirve de poco en este siglo
  • Ricardo shared from Mindwise: How We Understand What Others Think, Believe, Feel, and Want by Nicholas Epley
    If you really want to understand your coworker or competitor or children, don’t rely on modern mediums of communication that give you only a modern Rorschach test about the mind of another person. Twitter does not allow others to understand your deep thoughts and broad perspective. It only allows others to confirm how stupid they already think you are.
    Note: Twitter only allows others to confirm how stupid they already think you are
  • Ricardo shared from Mindwise: How We Understand What Others Think, Believe, Feel, and Want by Nicholas Epley
    Let’s tackle the big one first: e-mail. Much of what we communicate to others depends not only on what we say but on how we say it. The same comment about one’s “nice hair,” “great question,” or “brilliant idea” can be taken as a compliment or an insult, depending on the tone of your voice or the smirk on your face. None of this subtlety makes it into your in-box. Although it’s not as bad as tapping out a novel in Morse code, text-based mediums like e-mail and Twitter nevertheless communicate the content of what is said but little of the subtle context of how it is said, making...
    Note: El problema del email, o Twitter ...
  • Ricardo shared from Mindwise: How We Understand What Others Think, Believe, Feel, and Want by Nicholas Epley
    Brown bread lovers think they are larger in number than white bread lovers.24 Conservatives tend to believe that the average person is more conservative than liberals do.25 Voters on both sides of an issue tend to believe that those who didn’t vote in an election would have voted for their side, if they had chosen to vote.26 And when it comes to morality, even those who are clearly in the minority nevertheless tend to believe that they are in the moral majority.27
    Note: Siempre queda la superioridad moral
  • Ricardo shared from Mindwise: How We Understand What Others Think, Believe, Feel, and Want by Nicholas Epley
    George Orwell described his own reluctance to shoot during the Spanish Civil War. “At this moment,” he wrote, “a man, presumably carrying a message to an officer, jumped out of the trench and ran along the top of the parapet in full view. He was half-dressed and was holding up his trousers with both hands as he ran. I refrained from shooting at him. It is true that I am a poor shot and unlikely to hit a running man at a hundred yards. … Still, I did not shoot partly because of that detail about the trousers. I had come here to shoot at ‘Fascists,’ but a man who is holding up his...
    Note: Un hombre que se sujeta los pantalones que se caen no es un fascista
  • Ricardo shared from Mindwise: How We Understand What Others Think, Believe, Feel, and Want by Nicholas Epley
    This is not an isolated issue limited to one political stripe; people on both the right and the left tend to see the moderate media as biased against their own position simply because moderate opinions differ from more extreme ones, a phenomenon referred to as the “hostile media bias.” When commentator Juan Williams was fired from National Public Radio for making ambiguously racist remarks, conservative Senator Jim DeMint tweeted, “The incident with Juan Williams reminds us the only free speech liberals support is the speech with which they agree.” When other people don’t share your...
    Note: Yo tengo la razón y tú estás sesgado