Recent Activity

  • Richard shared from Lincoln's Little Girl (Kindle Single) by Cecelia Holland
    Lincoln went up to the attic, sat in the audience and laughed and applauded with everybody else. An intolerable pressure was mounting on Lincoln. The war growing like a tumor that would consume everything. The children gave him a way to escape for a moment, and he took it, well worth a nickel.
    Note: The Lincoln boys and friends put on a circus in the White House attic and charged 5¢ admission.
  • Richard shared from Lincoln's Little Girl (Kindle Single) by Cecelia Holland
    One day, in a meeting with some of his Cabinet, Lincoln was standing at the window looking out toward Virginia, as he often did, when something much closer took his eye. Sprinting out of the room, he bounded down the steps and out onto the front lawn, where Tad had spread armfuls of the family clothes on the grass and was selling them to raise money for Clara Barton’s Sanitary Commission.
    Note: Tad was Lincoln's son!
  • Richard shared from Where Are They Buried (Revised and Updated): How Did They Die? Fitting Ends and Final Resting Places of the Famous, Infamous, and Noteworthy by Tod Benoit
    Kate Smith will forever be best remembered as the vibrantly brave and passionate singer who made “God Bless America” an unofficial national anthem. Kate introduced the Irving Berlin song to the country in 1938 and, when it became apparent that it had achieved significance beyond that of just another pop tune, she refused to profit from the song, instead donating the royalties from its performances to the Boy and Girl Scouts of America, an arrangement that remains in place. Once, President Roosevelt quite aptly introduced Kate to England’s King George VI by stating, simply, “This is Kate...
    Note: Wishing everyone a happy and safe 4th of July holiday
  • Richard shared from Where Are They Buried (Revised and Updated): How Did They Die? Fitting Ends and Final Resting Places of the Famous, Infamous, and Noteworthy by Tod Benoit
    Quizzed about his pastimes, he replied, “I hate sports. I also hate gardening and walking. I don’t go to movies or the theater or watch television, but what I do like is lying down.”
    Note: Joseph Heller author of Catch 22 ...
  • Richard shared from Where Are They Buried (Revised and Updated): How Did They Die? Fitting Ends and Final Resting Places of the Famous, Infamous, and Noteworthy by Tod Benoit
    In 1961, Ian suffered a heart attack and, recognizing that perhaps his time was near, put to paper an entirely different kind of story, a tale of a flying car with a bubbly personality, a story he had been carrying around in his head for years. Based on bedtime stories he used to tell his son, the children’s classic, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, was published just a few months before Ian’s August 1964 death, at the age of 56, to heart failure.
    Note: Ian Fleming is known for his 12 James Bond novels.
  • Richard shared from Where Are They Buried (Revised and Updated): How Did They Die? Fitting Ends and Final Resting Places of the Famous, Infamous, and Noteworthy by Tod Benoit
    Terry was hired on the spot and she immediately began living the high life, which meant two weeks at Judy Garland’s house and a $125-a-week salary. But life in the spotlight wasn’t always glamorous. Terry didn’t like being in the basket, she cowered when the set’s wind machines were switched on, and she suffered a sprained foot after being stepped on accidentally by one of the Witch’s guards. But Terry recuperated, and she returned a few weeks later to film the Munchkinland scenes, as good as new. After Oz, Terry’s name was officially changed to Toto and she appeared in another half-dozen...
    Note: Toto from the Wizard of Oz was actually a female terrier named Terry
  • Richard shared from Where Are They Buried (Revised and Updated): How Did They Die? Fitting Ends and Final Resting Places of the Famous, Infamous, and Noteworthy by Tod Benoit
    Plagued with insomnia and depression, Audie suffered from what is now called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. The condition was then known as “battle fatigue,” which implied that its effects would wear off with time and rest. But decades after WWII had ended, many veterans, including Audie, could find no respite. In his celebrity, Audie was candid about his battle-fatigue problems and made a public call for the United States government to study the emotional impact of war and to address its effects.
    Note: Audie Murphy was a war hero who suffered PTSD
  • Richard shared from Where Are They Buried (Revised and Updated): How Did They Die? Fitting Ends and Final Resting Places of the Famous, Infamous, and Noteworthy by Tod Benoit
    Graduating from high school during the Depression, Walter Matuchanskavasky took a series of government jobs—as a forester in Montana, a gym instructor for the WPA, a boxing coach for policemen—before enlisting in the Army Air Corps and serving as a radio cryptographer during World War II.
    Note: Walter Matthau's Montana connection
  • Richard shared from Where Are They Buried (Revised and Updated): How Did They Die? Fitting Ends and Final Resting Places of the Famous, Infamous, and Noteworthy by Tod Benoit
    was buried in a dark blue suit with a light blue shirt and a red tie. Dhoore continued, “We put three cigars in his pocket, put on his toupee, put on his watch that Gracie gave him and his ring. And, in his pocket, his keys and his wallet with ten hundred-dollar bills, a five, and three ones, so wherever he went to play bridge he’d have enough money.”
    Note: George Burns age 100 was buried with cigars and cash ... nice touch :)
  • Richard shared from Where Are They Buried (Revised and Updated): How Did They Die? Fitting Ends and Final Resting Places of the Famous, Infamous, and Noteworthy by Tod Benoit
    Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It’s perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we’ve learned something from yesterday. —JOHN WAYNE’S EPITAPH
(Helena, Montana)
Richard Norine