Recent Activity

  • Robert shared from How to Fly a Horse: The Secret History of Creation, Invention, and Discovery by Kevin Ashton
    Many “executives” spend half of their week in “planning” meetings and the other half preparing for them. You cannot build a plan that predicts your setbacks
    Note: This is the core reason why too much planning is bad. LBC No planning is equally as bad.
  • Robert shared from How to Fly a Horse: The Secret History of Creation, Invention, and Discovery by Kevin Ashton
    You cannot control the future. Being too rigid about making things happen the way you planned stops you from reacting to emerging problems and causes you to miss unexpected opportunities.
    Note: This is a my pd philosophy. More time doing, thinking & learning less planning tasks
  • Robert shared from How to Fly a Horse: The Secret History of Creation, Invention, and Discovery by Kevin Ashton
    The biggest lesson from the story of Kelly Johnson and the Skunk Works is that creation is doing, not saying. The most creative organizations prioritize rituals of doing; the least creative organizations prioritize rituals of saying, the most common of which is the meeting. “Meeting” is a euphemism for “talking”; therefore, meetings are an alternative to work.
    Note: OMG - I have been saying this to my partners for ever. Meetings are NOT the work. Doing is
  • Robert shared from How to Fly a Horse: The Secret History of Creation, Invention, and Discovery by Kevin Ashton
    Much of what happens in internal meetings is called “planning,” but planning is of limited value, because nothing ever goes according to plan.
    Note: We plan when we are the "stupidest" about a project. Managing to plan is stupid squared!
  • Robert shared from How to Fly a Horse: The Secret History of Creation, Invention, and Discovery by Kevin Ashton
    Truth-tellers are genuinely passionate about solving big problems. They harangue you with their vision, and as a result they rarely stay in one company for very long. They are not model employees—their true loyalty is to the future, not next quarter’s profits. They can tell you what’s coming, but not necessarily when or how. Truth-tellers are often eccentric and difficult to manage. They speak a strange language, one that isn’t focused on incremental change and polite business-speak. Learning to find them is hard. Learning to understand them, and appreciate their value, is even harder.
    Note: My corporate career summed up in one paragraph. Humbling but reality.
  • Robert shared from How to Fly a Horse: The Secret History of Creation, Invention, and Discovery by Kevin Ashton
    Intellectual security is not related to intellect. People who are more skilled with their hands than their minds are often intellectually secure. They know what they know and enjoy people who know more. Brilliant people are usually intellectually secure, too—and for the same reason.
    Note: Never thought about this before but a very important distinction. It explains why clay & I get along
  • Robert shared from How to Fly a Horse: The Secret History of Creation, Invention, and Discovery by Kevin Ashton
    Let them brutally scrutinize the data, or the draft, or the sketch and cut out anything and everything that doesn’t need to be there. Selection is a bloody process. Beautiful work, maybe months in the making, is culled in moments.
    Note: Brutal honesty, trust and authenticity are the greatest time savers. My definition of a friend.
  • Robert shared from How to Fly a Horse: The Secret History of Creation, Invention, and Discovery by Kevin Ashton
    Almost nothing we create will be good the first time. It will seldom be bad. It will probably be a dull shade of average.
    Note: a fact for me. Taguchi's RDOE enabled me take a average, learn fast & deliver extraordinary results
  • Robert shared from How to Fly a Horse: The Secret History of Creation, Invention, and Discovery by Kevin Ashton
    A thing begun is less right than wrong, more flaw than finesse, all problem and no solution. Nothing begins good, but everything good begins. Everything can be revised, erased, or rearranged later. The courage of creation is making bad beginnings.
    Note: This is my prototyping philosophy. Birthed by my dyslexic gift & never being right but always better
  • Robert shared from How to Fly a Horse: The Secret History of Creation, Invention, and Discovery by Kevin Ashton
    We sell our soul when we waste our time. We drive neither ourselves nor our world forward if we choose idling over inventing.
    Note: This is why I collect watches. A constant reminder that TIME is the most precious of all resources!