Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Steve shared from Lean Enterprise: How High Performance Organizations Innovate at Scale (Lean (O'Reilly)) by Jez Humble, Joanne Molesky, Barry O'Reilly
    The FutureSmart team’s deployment pipeline allows a 400-person distributed team to integrate 100–150 changes — about 75–100 thousand lines of code — into trunk on their 10-million-line codebase every day. Each day, the deployment pipeline produces 10–14 good builds of the firmware out of Level 1. All changes — including feature development and large-scale changes — are made on trunk. Developers commit into trunk several times every week.
    Note: For my finance colleagues who think they have exceptionally large code bases
  • Steve shared from Lean Enterprise: How High Performance Organizations Innovate at Scale (Lean (O'Reilly)) by Jez Humble, Joanne Molesky, Barry O'Reilly
    in May of 2011, Amazon achieved a mean time between deployments to production systems of 11.6 seconds, with up to 1,079 such deployments in a single hour, aggregated across the thousands of services that comprise Amazon’s platform. Some of these deployments affected upwards of 10,000 hosts.2 Amazon, of course, is subject to regulations such as Sarbanes-Oxley and PCI-DSS.
    Note: Oh crap, now I really feel inadequate.
  • Steve shared from Management 3.0: Leading Agile Developers, Developing Agile Leaders (Adobe Reader) (Addison-Wesley Signature Series (Cohn)) by Jurgen Appelo
    Curry, Andrew “Monopoly Killer: Perfect German Board Game Redefines Genre” <http://www.wired.com/gaming/gamingreviews/magazine/17-04/mf_settlers>. Wired. March 23, 2009.
    Note: The creation of Settlers of Cataan
  • Steve shared from Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
    The acquisition of skills requires a regular environment, an adequate opportunity to practice, and rapid and unequivocal feedback about the correctness of thoughts and actions.
    Note: From Thinking Fast and Slow
  • Steve shared from Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman
    However, optimism is highly valued, socially and in the market; people and firms reward the providers of dangerously misleading information more than they reward truth tellers.
    Note: This is not about software!
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