About Steven R. Harris

Library collections dude. Dog-loving fool. Technology addict. Postmodern novel reader.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Steven shared from The Academic Book of the Future by Rebecca E. Lyons, Samantha Rayner
    This means that the academic book of the future must do more than remediate the printed codex, replicating the experience of paper books in digital formats as current e-readers typically do.
    Note: Ebook isn't pbook.
  • Steven shared from Part of Our Lives: A Peoples History of the American Public Library by Wayne A. Wiegand
    Beginning in 1894, after scores of patrons dropped the drawers and spilled the contents across the floor, manufacturers inserted rods through holes punched in the lower middle part of the card to hold them in place.
    Note: Technological advancement of the card catalog.
  • Steven shared from Part of Our Lives: A Peoples History of the American Public Library by Wayne A. Wiegand
    Because of print’s ability to create mass culture, voluntary reading—the kind public libraries best facilitated—became a way to build and maintain social networks. Reading also functioned as a cultural project where individual readers read themselves into texts, and it facilitated a kind of character building and cultural refinement that was concerned with aesthetic as well as intellectual satisfactions.
    Note: Library reading as cultural immersion and cultural identification.
  • Steven shared from Part of Our Lives: A Peoples History of the American Public Library by Wayne A. Wiegand
    By 1876, American cultural authorities were endorsing four modes of reading. Among public sphere institutions, the church was the strongest advocate for the evangelical mode, the school for the civic mode, while social and public libraries established to disseminate useful knowledge advocated the self-improvement mode, illustrated nicely by the experiences of Thomas Edison.
    Note: Four modes of reading, 4th being cultural reading*evangelical*civic*self improvement*cultural
  • Steven shared from Part of Our Lives: A Peoples History of the American Public Library by Wayne A. Wiegand
    This “mass of texts,” contested a male colleague in 1848, has “leaped from the press like the frogs of Egypt,” most of it “unmitigated trash, the froth of superficial thinking, the scum of diseased sentiment.
    Note: Popular reading in libraries.