About Steven R. Harris

Library collections dude. Dog-loving fool. Technology addict. Postmodern novel reader.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Steven shared from All That Followed: A Novel by Gabriel Urza
    I remember the saying I heard once, how the Basque Country’s history can be divided in half by the Civil War, and it occurs to me that perhaps that bullet has never stopped moving through our town. That it is still traveling through Muriga, striking one of us down every now and again.
    Note: Spectacular book...
  • Steven shared from All That Followed: A Novel by Gabriel Urza
    I remember the saying I heard once, how the Basque Country’s history can be divided in half by the Civil War, and it occurs to me that perhaps that bullet has never stopped moving through our town. That it is still traveling through Muriga, striking one of us down every now and again.
    Note: What an awesome book. I love the way it is constructed out of little vignettes and how those vignettes have such power and emotion.
  • Steven shared from Diffusion of Innovations, 5th Edition by Everett M. Rogers
    The main questions that an individual typically asks about a new idea include “What is the innovation?” “How does it work?” “Why does it work?” “What are the innovation’s consequences?” and “What will its advantages and disadvantages be in my situation?
    Note: Innovation adopters.
  • Steven shared from Diffusion of Innovations, 5th Edition by Everett M. Rogers
    Often a company will sell a hardware product at a relatively low price in order to capture market share and then sell its software at a relatively high price in order to recover profits. An example is video game players; these are sold at a fairly low price, but the video games to be played on them are sold at a relatively high price. This “shaver-and-blades” strategy is commonly used to speed the diffusion of consumer electronics innovations.
    Note: Diffusion of innovations
  • Steven shared from Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes, Edith Grossman
    being matters more than knowing.
    Note: Harold Bloom