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  • The_Bad_Wolf shared from Handbook of Communication and Aging Research (Lea's Communication Series) by Jon F. Nussbaum, Justine Coupland
    The ideal aim of the youthful mask is to create more than a temporary and vulnerable presentation of a youthful self; it is to arrest the geriatric processes of normal aging through contemporary techniques of body maintenance and repair (Hepworth & Featherstone, 1982). In this particular physiognomic image of the aging process, age is not merely skin deep. External appearance and inner physiology are all of the piece: the integrity of the one reflects that of the other. The youthful mask, then, can be described as an idealized image of the positive aging that is only the latest development in...
  • The_Bad_Wolf shared from Handbook of Communication and Aging Research (Lea's Communication Series) by Jon F. Nussbaum, Justine Coupland
    The mask is, of course, a dualistic concept of aging conceived as a process characterized by a progressive and possibly traumatic sense of disengagement of the inner from the outer social self. Signs of the unchanging element of identity—the inner self—can occasionally be glimpsed when the mask slips or when, as in the case of one of Miss Marple's denouements, it is deliberately removed.
  • The_Bad_Wolf shared from Handbook of Communication and Aging Research (Lea's Communication Series) by Jon F. Nussbaum, Justine Coupland
    Although the scientific basis for physiognomy has long been discredited, the belief that external appearance represents the inner self continues to influence our conceptualization of the relationship between the body and the self.
  • The_Bad_Wolf shared from Handbook of Communication and Aging Research (Lea's Communication Series) by Jon F. Nussbaum, Justine Coupland
    The belief that the true inner character or self is revealed on the visible face and body is one of the central tenets of the ancient pseudoscience of physiognomy.
  • The_Bad_Wolf shared from Handbook of Communication and Aging Research (Lea's Communication Series) by Jon F. Nussbaum, Justine Coupland
    Looking into a mirror, therefore, is an act of self-comparison and classification. Mirrors are not simply reflecting surfaces; they reflect the cultural repertoire of visual images already embedded in our imagination.