About Timothy Carmody

Technology and media writer for Wired. Recovering academic. Lover of history and people with curly hair. Dad. Redhead.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Timothy shared from Close to the Machine: Technophilia and Its Discontents by Ellen Ullman
    The world as humans understand it and the world as it must be explained to computers come together in the programmer in a strange state of disjunction.
    Note: Programmer: strange junction of world humans understand & world as it must be explained to computers
  • Timothy shared from Close to the Machine: Technophilia and Its Discontents by Ellen Ullman
    at last there was a bridge between reality at large and the empire of nerds, which seemed nonreactive and immune to subjectivity, beauty, love, or the acknowledgment of fundamental frailty.
    Note: "The empire of nerds- seemed immune to subjectivity, love, or acknowledgment of fundamental frailty"
  • Timothy shared from The Breaks of the Game by David Halberstam
    “Fame,” O.J. said, walking along, “is a vapor, popularity is an accident, and money takes wings. The only thing that endures is character.” “Where’d you get that from?” Cowlings asked. “Heard it one night on TV in Buffalo,” O.J. said. “I was watching a late hockey game on Canadian TV and all of a sudden a guy just said it. Brought me right up out of my chair. I never forgot it.” —From an article by Paul Zimmerman, Sports Illustrated, November 26, 1979, on O. J. Simpson
    Note: Fame is a vapor, popularity is an accident... The only thing that endures is character.- OJ Simpson
  • Timothy shared from Theory of Fun for Game Design by Raph Koster
    Playing a goal-oriented game involves simply recognizing a particular sort of pattern; playing make-believe is recognizing another one.
    Note: Playing a game w/a goal involves recognizing one sort of pattern; playing make-believe another sort
  • Timothy shared from Pragmatism by William James
    The actually experienced world is supposed to be the same in its details on either hypothesis, "the same, for our praise or blame," as Browning says. It stands there indefeasibly: a gift which can't be taken back.
    Note: "The actually experienced world is... a gift which can't be taken back." - William James
(Lansing, MI United States)
Timothy Carmody