Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Wiley shared from Letters from a Stoic: Epistulae Morales Ad Lucilium (Classics) by Seneca
    When a mind is impressionable and has none too firm a hold on what is right, it must be rescued from the crowd: it is so easy for it to go over to the majority. A
  • Wiley shared from Winning the Story Wars: Why Those Who Tell (and Live) the Best Stories Will Rule the Future by Jonah Sachs
    Stories have the power to radically alter people’s behavior—and changing people’s behavior so they’ll think, buy, or vote differently, despite their fear of change, is what marketing is all about.
    Note: Great book!
  • Wiley shared from Winning the Story Wars: Why Those Who Tell (and Live) the Best Stories Will Rule the Future by Jonah Sachs
    Brad Jakeman, the former advertising chief at Macy’s and Citigroup, sums up the common frustration of today’s marketer: “The irony is that while there have never been more ways to reach consumers, it’s never been harder to connect with consumers.”
  • Wiley shared from The Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War by David Halberstam
    In the 1950 elections McCarthy scored two important victories. His primary target that year was Senator Millard Tydings, an old-fashioned, quite aristocratic Maryland Democrat whom Roosevelt had earlier tried to purge because he was so conservative. Tydings had been appalled by McCarthy’s charges, so reckless and partisan, and in the summer of 1950 he had taken a subcommittee and studied them, investigating the investigator so to speak. The Tydings Committee eventually criticized McCarthy for his behavior and exonerated most of those attacked by him. McCarthy’s accusations, it reported, “represented...
    Note: Think politics is dirty now?
  • Wiley shared from The Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War by David Halberstam
    In the 1950 elections McCarthy scored two important victories. His primary target that year was Senator Millard Tydings, an old-fashioned, quite aristocratic Maryland Democrat whom Roosevelt had earlier tried to purge because he was so conservative. Tydings had been appalled by McCarthy’s charges, so reckless and partisan, and in the summer of 1950 he had taken a subcommittee and studied them, investigating the investigator so to speak. The Tydings Committee eventually criticized McCarthy for his behavior and exonerated most of those attacked by him. McCarthy’s accusations, it reported, “represented...
    Note: Think politics is dirty now?
(Decatur, GA)
Wiley