About Wilson Camilo Uribe Neira

Desarrollador y operador web en la búsqueda de una idea para crear una startup y/o una buena a la cual unirme.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • Wilson shared from My Fight / Your Fight by Ronda Rousey
    And while she went from bartender to superstardom, the reality is that she was always this amazing athlete, a former Olympic medalist who finally found what it was she wanted to do.
  • Wilson shared from a Personal Document
    In 2010, she took a job on the graveyard shift at a 24 Hour Fitness but still couldn’t afford bedsheets. She found a new boyfriend, this one a recovering heroin addict whose relapse ended the relationship. That, and he stole her car. She has asked herself over and over why she picks such bad men.
  • Wilson shared from a Personal Document
    Rousey was born in Riverside County, Calif., with her umbilical cord wrapped around her neck. She was blue. Doctors revived her, but those crucial moments without oxygen led to developmental delays. She didn’t begin talking until she was 4 years old. “At about 6, I began speaking coherently in sentences,” Rousey says. “They told me I had brain damage from the hypoxia. But when you’re a kid, your brain figures out a way to reorganize.”
  • Wilson shared from a Personal Document
    These guys, handpicked through a series of audition processes, were serious fighters. In the gym, the real narratives were formed. They were put through the rigors up front and early because people needed to respect just how extreme and difficult it is to be an Ultimate Fighter. These were fighters first, and characters second. It was quickly made clear that they could endure as much hell as they could unleash.
    Note: It was quickly made clear that they could endure as much hell as they could unleash.
  • Wilson shared from Which Comes First, Cardio or Weights?: Fitness Myths, Training Truths, and Other Surprising Discoveries from the Science of Exercise by Alex Hutchinson
    The specific exercises you choose should be tailored to your goals. For athletes, that means choosing exercises that mimic the motions you’ll be using in your sport and doing them at realistic speeds. For example, baseball players are advised to swing the bat at least 100 times a day (three times a week) to increase bat speed, but using a “donut” to make the bat heavier is discouraged because it makes you practice swinging more slowly, according to a 2009 review in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. “Explosive” rotational exercises with a medicine ball have also been...
    Note: choosing exercises that mimic the motions you’ll be using in your sport at realistic speeds