About amayfield

For pleasure I read fiction. A lot of crime novels (Lawrence Block, Ian Rankin, James Ellroy are my favourites), literary fare (David Mitchell, Ian McEwan, Martin Amis, I like) and a furtive few science fiction (mostly Iain M Banks and Neal Stephenson).

In non-fiction I tend to go for history, psychology, innovation and business strategy books.

My work "about me" reads:


. . .

Antony Mayfield is the founder of Brilliant Noise, a digital strategy consultancy and do-tank, working with major brands, media and marketing agencies. He founded the content and social media teams at iCrossing, which became the largest independent digital marketing firm in the world, before being sold to Hearst Media in 2010. He is also the author of Me and My Web Shadow a book on how to manage personal reputation online, published internationally by Bloomsbury. 

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • amayfield shared from The Future of the Mind: The Scientific Quest To Understand, Enhance and Empower the Mind by Michio Kaku
    Dr. Daniel Gilbert, a psychologist at Harvard, writes, “For the first few hundred million years after their initial appearance on our planet, our brains were stuck in the permanent present, and most brains still are today. But not yours and not mine, because two or three million years ago our ancestors began a great escape from the here and now. …”
    Note: Imaging the future defines being human...
  • amayfield shared from Jony Ive: The Genius Behind Apple's Greatest Products by Leander Kahney
    Jony countered that the iMac wasn’t designed to look different, but the machine ended up being different as a natural consequence of the design process. ‘I think a lot of people see design primarily as a means to differentiate their product competitively,’ he said. ‘I really detest that. That is just a corporate agenda, not a customer or people agenda. It is important to understand that our goal wasn’t just to differentiate our product, but to create products that people would love in the future. Differentiation was a consequence of our goal.’61
    Note: This was the Ive quote I meant to post with that last tweet
  • amayfield shared from Jony Ive: The Genius Behind Apple's Greatest Products by Leander Kahney
    Jony countered that the iMac wasn’t designed to look different, but the machine ended up being different as a natural consequence of the design process. ‘I think a lot of people see design primarily as a means to differentiate their product competitively,’ he said. ‘I really detest that. That is just a corporate agenda, not a customer or people agenda. It is important to understand that our goal wasn’t just to differentiate our product, but to create products that people would love in the future. Differentiation was a consequence of our goal.’
  • amayfield shared from Be Excellent at Anything: Four changes to get more out of work and life by Tony Schwartz, Ph.D., Catherine McCarthy, Jean Gomes
    Charles Czeisler, another renowned sleep researcher and chronobiologist at Harvard Medical School, puts it more bluntly: “Like a drunk, a person who is sleep-deprived has no idea how functionally impaired he or she truly is. Most of us have forgotten what it really feels like to be awake.”
    Note: "Most of us have forgotten what it really feels like to be awake."
  • amayfield shared from Be Excellent at Anything: Four changes to get more out of work and life by Tony Schwartz, Ph.D., Catherine McCarthy, Jean Gomes
    A growing body of research suggests that we’re most productive when we move between periods of high focus and intermittent rest. Instead, we live in a gray zone, constantly juggling activities but rarely fully engaging in any of them—or fully disengaging from any of them. The consequence is that we settle for a pale version of the possible.
    Note: Do you work in focused bursts or "the grey zone"? #smartereveryday
(Brighton & Hove)
amayfield