Recent Activity

  • amy shared from Circus Mirandus by Cassie Beasley
    “Hmmmkay?” It was a good sound in his opinion. It might have meant yes, and it might have meant no, but it satisfied Jenny. She went back to her notes. As
    Note: Giggling at this. #booktweepa
  • amy shared from Circus Mirandus by Cassie Beasley
    He could still taste the words in his mouth, and they tasted like the truth. He
    Note: The word choice, right on! ? #booktweeps
  • amy shared from Circus Mirandus by Cassie Beasley
    “Of course I’ll be back by then, Harriet. This thing can’t drag on forever, and I’ve already got everything sorted out here. I’ll be on the way home before you know it.” It’s
    Note: Ugh! Crystal clear here that the aunt is just putting in her time! #booktweeps
  • amy shared from Circus Mirandus by Cassie Beasley
    But even those two were basically chocolate cakes and warm sweaters on the inside. Micah’s great-aunt, Gertrudis, was not. He washed a pink china teacup for the third time that Sunday afternoon while she loomed over him. She clucked her tongue, and he scrubbed the cup until he worried the painted roses might fade right off. On the inside, Aunt Gertrudis was probably cough syrup. She
    Note: Great description of old ladies & aunt...chocolate vs cough syrup #booktweeps @beasleywrites
  • amy shared from Inevitable: Mass Customized Learning by Beatrice McGarvey, Beatrice McGarvey
    Feedback is best and most powerful when it is specific rather than general, provided in the here-and-now, modeled by a learning coach, and when it provides the learner the opportunity for a quick second try.
    Note: Effective feedback
  • amy shared from Inevitable: Mass Customized Learning by Beatrice McGarvey, Beatrice McGarvey
    Feedback is best and most powerful when it is specific rather than general, provided in the here-and-now, modeled by a learning coach, and when it provides the learner the opportunity for a quick second try.
    Note: The importance of feedback
  • amy shared from Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom by Sylvia Libow Martinez, Gary S. Stager
    Great projects benefit the learner more than the teacher.
    Note: Enjoying Invent to Learn by @garystager
  • amy shared from Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom by Sylvia Libow Martinez, Gary S. Stager
    Inquiry begins with what students want to know and the things they wonder about. Allowing students to explore these questions drives their desire to learn. When we build off this natural phenomenon, we support learners along the path to knowledge and understanding without expecting a right answer. Successful learning expeditions use the curriculum as the buoy, not the boat.
    Note: #pbl #plpnetwork
  • amy shared from Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom by Sylvia Libow Martinez, Gary S. Stager
    When we allow children to experiment, take risks, and play with their own ideas, we give them permission to trust themselves.
    Note: #plpnetwork #ce13
  • amy shared from Evocative Coaching: Transforming Schools One Conversation at a Time by Bob Tschannen-Moran, Megan Tschannen-Moran
    If teachers do not experience coaches as authentically celebrating the best of what is, there is no way they will join up with us to create the best of what might be.
    Note: Rings so true #plpnetwork
(York, PA, US)
amy musone