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  • apetrovsky shared from xUnit Test Patterns: Refactoring Test Code by Gerard Meszaros
    Software developers will probably find the term "system under test" (abbreviated throughout this book as SUT) unfamiliar. It is short for "whatever thing we are testing." When we are writing unit tests, the SUT is whatever class or method(s) we are testing; when we are writing customer tests, the SUT is probably the entire application (or at least a major subsystem of it).
    Note: the right definition for SUT: whatever class or method(s) we are testing
  • apetrovsky shared from Engineering Long-Lasting Software: An Agile Approach Using SaaS and Cloud Computing, Beta Edition by David Patterson, Armando Fox
    We want students to understand that in the real world, programmers are rewarded not for the number of lines of code written or for how quickly they can “bash out” a feature, but for functionality delivered with high assurance of stability and while keeping the codebase beautiful and maintainable for continued growth.
    Note: This is similar to the quote from G/Guice: result is not just tons of code.
  • apetrovsky shared from Google Guice: Agile Lightweight Dependency Injection Framework (FirstPress) by Robbie Vanbrabant
    So there you have it: unit testing helps achieve maintainability. And what else can help you achieve that? Writing less code, of course! The less code you need to accomplish what you're trying to do, the less code you'll need to maintain.
    Note: What a right thought: the less code, the less bugs, the less maintenance, the closer the result.
  • apetrovsky shared from Mastering Ninject for Dependency Injection by Daniel Baharestani
    Instead of relying on reflection for invocation, Ninject takes advantage of lightweight code generation in the CLR (Common Language Runtime). This can result in a dramatic (8-50x) improvement in performance in many situations. Ninject includes many advanced features.
    Note: Reflection becomes obsolete if performance of an app in question.
  • apetrovsky shared from Rework by Jason Fried, David Heinemeier Hansson
    We’re not talking about all-nighters or sixteen-hour days—we’re talking about squeezing out a few extra hours a week. That’s enough time to get something going.
    Note: That's how to perform this: