Recent Activity

  • christianreber shared from Startup Life: Surviving and Thriving in a Relationship with an Entrepreneur by Brad Feld, Amy Batchelor
    You will hear us say over and over again that the first principle of relationships, and startups, is communication. Without consistent, effective, honest communication, your relationship situation will be much more challenging.
  • christianreber shared from Grouped: How small groups of friends are the key to influence on the social web (Voices That Matter) by Paul Adams
    More than the act of sharing content, marketing campaigns need to support conversations.
  • christianreber shared from Grouped: How small groups of friends are the key to influence on the social web (Voices That Matter) by Paul Adams
    We’re at the beginning of a cycle in business where we can move away from this idea of “influentials” and instead focus marketing activity on small connected groups of close friends.
  • christianreber shared from Grouped: How small groups of friends are the key to influence on the social web (Voices That Matter) by Paul Adams
    Businesses that place people, rather than content or technology, at the center of their business model are thriving and in some cases outperforming incumbents.
  • christianreber shared from a Personal Document
    As software developers, we are businesspeople. Our companies don’t employ us because they love us. They never have, and they never will. That’s not the job of a business. Businesses don’t exist so we can have a place to go every day. The purpose of a business is to make money. To excel at a company, you’re going to have to understand how you fit into the business’s plan to make money.
  • christianreber shared from Insanely Simple: The Obsession That Drives Apple's Success by Ken Segall
    How to Have a Great Meeting   1.Throw out the least necessary person at the table. 2. Walk out of this meeting if it lasts more than 30 minutes. 3. Do something productive today to make up for the time you spent here.
  • christianreber shared from Insanely Simple: The Obsession That Drives Apple's Success by Ken Segall
    Start with small groups of smart people—and keep them small. Every time the body count goes higher, you’re simply inviting Complexity to take a seat at the table. The small-group principle is deeply woven into the religion of Simplicity. It’s key to Apple’s ongoing success and key to any organization that wants to nurture quality thinking. The idea is pretty basic: Everyone in the room should be there for a reason. There’s no such thing as a “mercy invitation.” Either you’re critical to the meeting or you’re not. It’s nothing personal, just business.
  • christianreber shared from Insanely Simple: The Obsession That Drives Apple's Success by Ken Segall
    By no means am I saying that Simplicity is the sole factor behind Apple’s success. Leadership, vision, talent, imagination, and incredibly hard work may have just a bit to do with it. But there’s one common thread that runs through it all. That’s Simplicity.
(Berlin)
christianreber