About mattperman

Husband of one, father of three. Former director of strategy at Desiring God. Blog on leadership and theology. Starting a non-profit to equip Christians in the developing world with resources and to address large global problems.

Public Notes


Recent Activity

  • mattperman shared from Generous Justice: How God's Grace Makes Us Just by Timothy Keller
    care. This is why, if you look at every place the word is used in the Old Testament, several classes of persons continually come up. Over and over again, mishpat describes taking up the care and cause of widows, orphans, immigrants, and the poor—those who have been called “the quartet of the vulnerable.”19
    Note: Keller, 4/4
  • mattperman shared from Generous Justice: How God's Grace Makes Us Just by Timothy Keller
    regardless of race or social status. Anyone who does the same wrong should be given the same penalty. But mishpat means more than just the punishment of wrongdoing. It also means to give people their rights. Deuteronomy 18 directs that the priests of the tabernacle should be supported by a certain percentage of the people’s income. This support is described as “the priests’ mishpat,” which means their due or their right. So we read, “Defend the rights of the poor and needy” (Proverbs 31:9). Mishpat, then, is giving people what they are due, whether punishment or protection or
    Note: Keller, 3
  • mattperman shared from Generous Justice: How God's Grace Makes Us Just by Timothy Keller
    “justice” is the Hebrew term mishpat. In Micah 6:8, “mishpat puts the emphasis on the action, chesedh puts it on the attitude [or motive] behind the action.”18 To walk with God, then, we must do justice, out of merciful love. The word mishpat in its various forms occurs more than two hundred times in the Hebrew Old Testament. Its most basic meaning is to treat people equitably. So Leviticus 24:22 warns Israel to “have the same mishpat [“rule of law”] for the foreigner as the native.” Mishpat means acquitting or punishing every person on the merits of the case,
    Note: Keller, 2
  • mattperman shared from Generous Justice: How God's Grace Makes Us Just by Timothy Keller
    Justice Is Care for the Vulnerable Micah 6:8 is a summary of how God wants us to live. To walk humbly with God is to know him intimately and to be attentive to what he desires and loves. And what does that consist of? The text says to “do justice and love mercy,” which seem at first glance to be two different things, but they are not.17 The term for “mercy” is the Hebrew word chesedh, God’s unconditional grace and compassion. The word for
    Note: Keller on the meaning of justice in Micah 6:8:
  • mattperman shared from An American Life: The Autobiography by Ronald Reagan
    Until presidents have a line-item veto and there is a constitutional amendment mandating a balanced budget, I think the country is likely to face never-ending deficits piled up by a profligate Congress unable or unwilling to make the hard-nosed decisions necessary to bring down spending to a level the country can afford.
    Note: Reagan on how to balance the budget
(Maple Grove, MN)
mattperman