Recent Activity

  • sakata finished reading Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
  • sakata finished reading focus by Leo Babauta
  • sakata hopes to read focus by Leo Babauta
  • sakata shared from The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything by Ken Robinson Ph.D.
    Never underestimate the vital importance of finding early in life the work that for you is play. This turns possible underachievers into happy warriors.”
  • sakata shared from Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
    Why do we assume that simple is good? Because with physical products, we have to feel we can dominate them. As you bring order to complexity, you find a way to make the product defer to you. Simplicity isn’t just a visual style. It’s not just minimalism or the absence of clutter. It involves digging through the depth of the complexity. To be truly simple, you have to go really deep.
  • sakata shared from Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
    Most of them agree. “He would shout at a meeting, ‘You asshole, you never do anything right,’” Debi Coleman recalled. “It was like an hourly occurrence. Yet I consider myself the absolute luckiest person in the world to have worked with him.”
  • sakata shared from The Essential Drucker (Collins Business Essentials) by Peter F. Drucker
    A favorite story at management meetings is that of the three stonecutters who were asked what they were doing. The first replied, “I am making a living.” The second kept on hammering while he said, “I am doing the best job of stonecutting in the entire county.” The third one looked up with a visionary gleam in his eyes and said, “I am building a cathedral.”
  • sakata shared from The Essential Drucker (Collins Business Essentials) by Peter F. Drucker
    Management is the specific and distinguishing organ of any and all organizations.
  • sakata shared from Enchantment: The Art of Changing Hearts, Minds, and Actions by Guy Kawasaki
    My guideline is called the 10-20-30 rule: make a ten-slide presentation in twenty minutes with no font smaller than thirty points.
  • sakata shared from How To Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
    Criticism is futile because it puts a person on the defensive and usually makes him strive to justify himself. Criticism is dangerous, because it wounds a person’s precious pride, hurts his sense of importance, and arouses resentment.
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