or poor code) unrepaired. Fix each one as soon as it is discovered. If there is insufficient time to fix it properly, then board it up. Perhaps you can comment out the offending code, or display a "Not Implemented" message, or substitute dummy data instead. Take some action to prevent further damage and to show that you're on top of the situation.
It's time to bring out the stones. Work out what you can reasonably ask for. Develop it well. Once you've got it, show people, and let them marvel. Then say "of course, it would be better if we added...." Pretend it's not important. Sit back and wait for them to start asking you to add the functionality you originally wanted. People find it easier to join an ongoing success.
Don't be like the frog. Keep an eye on the big picture. Constantly review what's happening around you, not just what you personally are doing.
Critically Analyze What You Read and Hear Unfortunately, there are very few simple answers anymore. But with your extensive portfolio, and by applying some critical analysis to the