“It’s hard to summarize, but there are three things.” Did you ever notice how there are always three things? “Three things,” he says. “Exercise. Nutrition. And commitment.” “The biggest one—and the biggest change for most people—is exercise. It is the golden key to great health. You should exercise hard almost every day of your life. And do strength training, lift weights, two or three of those six days. Exercise is the great key to aging. This long slide . . .” again, the arching curve with his hand in the air, “can simply go away. Or go up for quite a while. And you can...
“Okay, if you could get back to one seventy someday, that would be great, but don’t stew about it. It’s much more important to exercise, regardless of what you weigh, and then learn to eat rationally from here on out. Quit eating the things that you know are rotten for you, like fast food and lots of fats and simple carbs. And eat less of everything.” He says dieting is dumb and doesn’t work, but my weight will drift down, over time, if I exercise the way I should and quit eating junk.
“Commitment.” He shrugs, as if to say this next part is harder to talk about. “What I mean is, you have to be involved with other people. And you have to care about something. Goals. Charities . . . people . . . family . . . job . . . hobbies. Especially after retirement, you have to dig in and take hold or things can take some bad turns.” He stops, stuck for a minute, struggling a little. “It’s specific to you, obviously. And it’s awfully hard to generalize, but there have to be people and causes you care about. Doesn’t seem to matter much just what they are. They don’t have...
In simple terms, you have a physical brain, an emotional brain and a thinking brain.