Caesar's reform was "projected with great scientific ingenuity," Plutarch writes, for the emperor "called in the best philosophers and mathematicians of his time to settle the point," in the end adopting "a new and more exact method of correcting the calendar."
Note: get someone from engineering on the line...
To correct for the "drift" that had already accumulated up to that time, Caesar ordered two extra months inserted into the year that we would label as 46 B.C. - making that particular year some 445 days long. He called it the "ultimus annus confiusionis": "the last year of confusion."
Note: that is one way to slow down the passing of time...
The emperor Augustus would later fiddle with the length of the months a hit more: if July was to have thirty-one days, so, surely, must August.
Note: wow i never knew this. interesting!
Indeed, the quantization of time may have been part of a larger trend of assigning numbers to previously uncounted (or poorly counted) entities - what historian Alfred Crosby has called the "quantitative revolution."
Note: the beginning of obsession with metrics...