avert untold suffering and death that had once seemed inevitable. If you walk across a patch of ground almost anywhere in the earth’s temperate zones, you’re likely to tread on nematodes, the ubiquitous set of worms that includes C. elegans. You don’t necessarily have to go walking to get close to them, though. In his entertaining history of nematode research, In the Beginning Was the Worm, science writer Andrew Brown notes that “there is a gruesome saying among worm researchers that if everything on earth were to disappear except the nematodes, the outline of all plants and animals would...
“IdG1-030, the world’s oldest living mouse, died peacefully in his sleep on November 15, 2001, at the age of 1450 days, just 11 days shy of what would have been his 4th birthday. Born and raised in a small plastic cage in Ann Arbor, MI, [his] parents had romped, poor but free, in the barnyards of Moscow, Idaho. . . . His great age did not, until the last day or two of his final illness, impair his zest for chewing wood chips or for doing pull-ups near the food hopper at the top of his cage. . . . IdG1-030 is survived by 9 half-nieces and nephews, 19 half grand-nieces and grand-nephews and...
Famed chemist Linus Pauling once said that “the way to get good ideas is to get lots of ideas, and throw the bad ones away.”
Rapamycin has been found to suppress formation of proteins that the AIDS virus needs to spread from cell to cell—another strange property for a drug that purportedly hurts immune function.