Cognitive scientists have made much progress in recent years in their attempts to understand how reading works—how it happens in the brain. A number of recent books have described this research, most notable among them Maryanne Wolf’s Proust and the Squid and Stanislas Dehaene’s Reading in the Brain,
this passage from Dehaene: “A written text is not a high-fidelity recording. Its goal is not to reproduce speech as we pronounce it, but rather to code it at a level abstract enough to allow the reader to quickly retrieve its meaning.” At
“A written text is not a high-fidelity recording. Its goal is not to reproduce speech as we pronounce it, but rather to code it at a level abstract enough to allow the reader to quickly retrieve its
a great deal of very thorough research into multitasking has been done in recent years, and it has produced some unequivocally clear results, chief among them being: • no one actually multitasks; instead, we shift among different tasks and give attention to only one at any given time; • the attempt to multitask results in a state of “continuous partial attention”; • those who believe they are skilled multitaskers tend to be worse at it than others. At the end of this book you’ll find references to back up these claims:
Note: refs here to research on multitasking, the downsides of